Wills : Thomas Olyver 1548, Nicholas Tuniclif 1590, Thomas Naden 1600, Alice Wardle 1603 Edward Plant the Younger 1609, Frances Bennett 1620, Roger Yate 1648, James Nealor (Naylor) 1669, Edmund Naden 1686, John Naden 1754, William Brunt 1834, Samuel Naden 1850, Christopher Coates 1850

 

 

Introduction to Wills

 

The will was often made shortly before death and the inventory was taken as soon as possible after death and before probate.  Wills were proved in the Ecclesiastical Courts hence the early wills all start with concerns about the testator’s soul.

 

A probate inventory is intended to record and value the whole personal (as opposed to real) estate of the deceased and was taken by three or four independent appraisers.   The appraisers usually took debts into account, both those the testator owed and those owing to him although the latter was the only legal requirement.  After funeral expenses, the repayment of debts is the first call on the testators estate.

 

In the 16th century it was quite common for overseers to be appointed, their duty was to give advice to the executors and to make sure that the terms of the will were carried out.

 

A few archaic words and terms found in wills

A close was an enclosed field and was usually used to graze horses and cattle apart from the herd.

Corn and hay are usually valued together so it isn’t usually possible to know whether corn is bread corn ie wheat or all kinds of grain.  Hay was usually cut on a fixed day, often Lammas, August 1st.

Crops - Rye and wheat were sown in the Autumn and barley, oats and peas were sown in the Spring.  Flax and hemp were sown in April and harvested in late July or August.  Seed was sown by hand from a bag or basket.

A dishbord was a dresser for displaying dishes and plates.

A flatt was one of the larger portions into which the open field was divided by turf balks.

Imprimis used in inventories is Latin for ‘especially’

Item also used in inventories is Latin for ‘likewise’ or ‘also’

Kye or kine were milch cows and in addition to producing milk and dairy products they also provided meat, hides, horn, glue (from hooves) tallow (from suet) and manure.

Malt/mault was used for making ale, safer to drink than polluted water and was also nourishing.  The strength of beer would vary from very strong to the “small beer” which was made by using the malt a second or third time.  Small beer was drunk by children and had a calorific value of 150-200 calories per pint and provided calcium and vitamins. 

Manure had a value and was included in inventories, it was spread on the land to increase fertility. 

A noncupative will was one which was recorded by word of mouth before witnesses.

Twinter beasts etc are animals two winters old.

Wain has two wheels and is designed to be drawn by oxen rather than horses;  seeing ‘yokes’ in early wills implies the use of oxen, not horses.

 

Thomas Olyver

Apart from the fact that Thomas Olyver had a wife Agnes and a son John, I know virtually nothing else.  I think he may have lived in the Heathylee area, possibly Ball Bank.  The problem with wills is that, until you have finished transcribing them, you don’t know what is missing!  It’s done now so, as it may be useful to someone, it’s going on this website!!!

 

Will of Thomas Olyver 1548

 

In the name of god amen the twenty day of February in the year of our lord god one thousand five hundred forty eygt and in the first yere of our soveryne lord King Edward the sixth I Thomas Olyver seke in bodye and whole in mynd make my testament and last will in this maner First I bequethe my soule to God Almightie and my bodye to be buryed in the churche yarde att Alstofeld  Also it is my will that John my sonne have twoo parts of my ta.. and Agnes my wyff the threde parte  I give to Agnes my wiff halfe of my goodes quicke and deade and all the deade goodes to be att the order of my wyffe and my wiff to have this house to dwell in for remains of her lyff  I gyve to Joane Wyte (portion?) to Margreate Wyte (portion?)  I bequethe to John my sonne an arke? the risudue of my goodes nott bequeathed my bodye buryed my detts payd I give to  John my sone Joan Wyte and Margreate Wite equallye delt  Also I orden and make Agnes my wiff and William Yate my lawfull executors to performe this my last will these byeing witness  George Shawre John Woode and Hugh Olyver with many moo. 

 

 

Inventory of Thomas Olyver 1548

 

Thys inventorie of the godes and catell of Thomas Olyver of the parish of Alstonfeld lately decessed seine and prysed by Henry Manyfald?  John ?  ? Frost and John Kydey?  19th day of Aprell in the year of our lord god 1557??

 

Imprimis 4 kye

Item a mare and a fole

Item 12 shepe

Item a gose and a gander

Item 3 ducks

Item 3 hennes and a coke

Item 3 pottes

Item 6 pannes

Item a pare of tonnges

Item a brandeyron

Item a axcell (grinding tools and parts?)

Item 3 arkes for ??

Item 6 ale(ald)…. and a sate

Item a baxton

Item a de..an for a ..

Item a haroo and a axe

Item 3 busshell of otte

Item 3 ho.s of otte meyle

 

Item 14 pewter dyshes

Item 2 chandelers?

Item quarters of beffe

Item 6 saks

Item of beydying

 


 

Nicholas Tuniclif 1590

Will of Nicholas Tuniclif 1590

The following is a transcription of the will of Nicholas Tuniclif, 1590, who lived at Colde Shaw. Tuniclif is a local name and Tunnicliffes have certainly lived for several generations in Hollinsclough. There is a Coldshaw (Colshaw) in Hollinsclough Parish however we think that Nicholas Tunicliff lived at Cold Shaw close to where Merril Grove is now. (There was a Cold Shaw there).

Also, the names of the witnesses and debtors correspond to people who then lived in the Heathylee/Fawfieldhead area (not in Hollinsclough) as shown on various rentals of the period.

At the time of writing the will, Nicholas had a wife Alice and son Hugh.
It is quite interesting to note that in the early wills, they were often made very close to death. In this case just 2 days beforehand.

Treine ware is wooden ware eg bowls, the word is derived from “tree”

The inventory is made in May, so note weaning calves, yearling colt i.e. all born in the spring to take advantage of food being available during the summer.

Will of Nicholas Tuniclif
Dated 22nd day of May 1590

In the name of God Amen the 22nd daye of May in the year of our lorde god one thousand five hundred and nyntie. I Nicholas Tuniclif of the Colde Shaw within the parish of Alstonfeilde and countie of Stafford, sicke in bodye, but of good and perfect memorie the lord therefore be praised, make and ordayne this my laste will and testament in maner and forme following. Firste I commend my soule unto almightie god my maker and unto Jesus Christe my saviour and redeemer and my body to be buried in the parish church yarde of Alstonfeilde aforesaid. Item I give and bequeathe unto Hugh Tuniclif my farme all my wooden wares bothe within my house and without my debtors being payd and discharged: Item I give and bequeathe unto my sayd sone my greatest pan and my greatest potte my debtors and funeral expenses being payd and discharged as aforesaid. Item I give and bequeathe all and singular the rest of my goodes and cattell wholly to Alice my wife and my children. Item I constitute ordayne and make William Olyver and Robert Wood my true and lawful executors of this my last will and testament and John Johnson and John Froste my supervisors to see this my last will and testament executed and performed as my trust in god. The will revoking all former wills legacies and bequeattes whatsoever.

These being witness
John Goodwyn
Roger Ryleye
Thomas Slacke Witness

Inventorie of Nicholas Tuniclif 24th May 1590
The inventorie of all the singular the goodes and cattell being quick and dead moveable or immoveable of Nicholas Tuniclif late of the parish of Alstonfeilde and Countie of Staffs decease seine(?) and praised the 24th day of May a dm 1590 by us John Johnson, John Froste, John Goodwyn and Hugh Redferne.

 

Imprimis 2 oxen

Item 2 kine

Item 2 mares and 1 yearling colt

Item 4 twinter heifers

Item 4 stirkes

Item 14 sheep

Item 7 weaning calfs

Item one ?

Item pullen

Item The croppe on the ground

Item Beef and baron

Item meale and malte

Item pewter and brasse

Item Bedding linen and woollen

Item his apparel

iron ware

wodden and treine ware}

with all implements of husbandrie}

 

Debtes with the decedent owing

Item To Thomas Morte

Item To William Sheplebothame

Item To George goodwyn

Item to the same george

Item to Richard Wodwarde

 

Item To John Milwarde

Item for the hire of ?

Item To John Goodwyn

Item To Roger ?

 

 

 

 

 

Debtes owing to the decedent

Item John Olyver

Item Richard Foxe

Item Henrie Bagshawe

 

 


 

Inventory of Thomas Naden 1600

(Unfortunately the will is missing)

The Nadens lived in the Bury/Rochdale area in the 16th century but in 1519/20 Thomas Naden murdered Edmund Kaye for which crime he was hung. A dispute ensued between the Crown and the Earl of Derby as to which should receive the Naden possessions.  At this time some of the Nadens moved (or fled?) to Hollinsclough.

I have a theory that the reason they settled in Hollinsclough was because, as they travelled south to get out of the reaches of the Duchy of Lancaster and the Earl of Derby, when they crossed the River Dove into Hollinsclough, they would be outside of their jurisdiction.  The Constable of Bury who was involved with the dispute was called James Scheppulbothom and the Shipplebothams (spelling varies) also moved to Hollinsclough at around the same time.  This could of course be sheer coincidence.  Another coincidence of a rather more fanciful nature …..  The Naden’s house was near to Stanleys Moor.  The first mention of the Stanneries in Hollinsclough is in a Naden document c1630.  Stanleys and Stanneries are very similar when spoken and that was how names were recorded.  Could they have brought the name with them??

There are several legal documents/indentures written between 1550-1650 regarding the Hollinsclough Nadens.  Two of these concern the marriage of daughters.  In each case the groom paid the bride’s parents for the privilege of marrying their daughter.  I had always thought that it was the other way round!  However, the bride’s family are losing a worker, presumably in her prime, and for that they need to be compensated.  The groom is gaining a worker and also ensuring that he has heirs.  So he should compensate his in-laws.  A dowry appeared to be a gift which enabled the future husband to provide for his wife in a fit and proper manner. (Looking at a couple of the early Hollinsclough wills, items such as a chest which a wife had brought with her when she married, were passed down to her daughter.)    

Back to facts!

This inventory was written by George Goodwyn senior.  Although two oxen are included, ploughing items are not listed.  Strangely there are no debts owing to Thomas.  There is one live swine mentioned.  Most pigs were culled and preserved in November time to provide food for the winter, presumably this pig was used for breeding.

 

Inventory

The Inventorie of all and singular the goods and cattell bothe quicke and dead moveable and immoveable of Thomas Naden of Hollesclougth in the parish of Alstonfeilde and in the countie of Stafforde husbandman Late deceased sene and praised the 16th day of Januarie Ano dm 1600 by us Willm Ollyver George Goodwyn, Willm Naden and Robert Johnson.

 

Imprimis two oxen                                        Debtes which  this testator oweth

Item two twinter steires                              

Item three kyne                                            Item to Rowlande Morewoodde

Item two twinter heifers                               Item to George Goodwyn Senr

Item two twinter calfes                                Item to George Goodwyn Junr

Item five yearrings calfes                             Item to Robert Johnson

Item foure weaninge calfes                            Item to George Upton

Item one mare

Item 7 sheepe

Item one leif swine

Item pullen

Item corne and hey

Item meale and malt

Item beef and baron

Item pewter and brasse

Item iron wares

Item wodden wares with all implements of husbandrie

Item beddynge linen and woollen

Item money in his purs

 

Probate was granted to Ellena Naden  who was related/married to Frances Naden, both of Holescloughe.

 


Will of Alice Wardle 1603

 

About Alice Wardle

Alice Wardle was a widow who lived at Wilshaw, Hollinsclough.  She had two sons, William and John, and a daughter, Joane.  William had two daughters Elizabeth and Ann, John had a daughter called Alice.

 

Alice made her will in January 1603 and died in June 1604.  The will, debts and inventory demonstrate the important role that women played as ‘local bankers’ at that time.  Compared with other wills of people in this area she was a wealthy woman.  The inventory and debts amounted to £109 16 5d.  She would have dictated the debts at the time of making her will.   These were recorded again when the inventory was taken after her death in 1604.   

 

About the Will

The will is fascinating both for what it says and also for what it doesn’t say.

 

Traditionally, a will would start by stating the testator’s name, the date and the Monarch’s name & year of reign.   In this case the monarch is not mentioned.   In 1603, Queen Elizabeth was expected to die at any moment, in fact although news travelled fast I expect that they made a decision not to name the monarch in case she had already died.

 

Alice left cows and ewes to her granddaughters. This was quite common even until recently, as girls would have a vested interest in learning about husbandry which would stand them in good stead throughout their lives.  The inventory taken in June 1604 shows that she owned a lot of livestock -  9 bullocks, 9 little kine, 5 heifers, 4 stirks, 4 calves, 2 swine, 60 ewes, 2 colts, 2 mares and a bull.

 

Looking at the number and descriptions (sex and age) of the cattle would suggest that the Wardles were consistently building their livestock.  As a generalisation it was considered that you would have to have 9 cows for a family to be totally self sufficient for milk, butter and cheese and also have sufficient dairy products to sell.  There are no dairy products recorded in the inventory taken in June.  The lack of such a record does not mean it wasn’t there.  She had 2 colts and 2 mares but there was no saddlery either.

 

The livestock level indicates that Alice must have had at least 70 acres of pasture, probably more.  Interestingly, in 1632/33 when the Senior Survey was carried out, Professor Senior records just over 81 acres in John Wardleys (Alice’s son) tenure at Wilshaw.  When Alice made her will, William was living at Wilshaw but presumably in the interim William had died or moved and his brother John had taken over the property.

 

Alice Wardle lived at Wilshaw Farm and there is still a building there. The fields mapped around the farm by Professor Senior in 1632/33 and a later survey in c1850 can be seen quite clearly via Google Earth.  The recorded areas of the individual fields are remarkably consistent for nearly 400 years.

 

The debts list shows that the people who owed money to her came from Chelmorton, Earl Sterndale  and Fairfield as well as Hollinsclough.  The fact that names and places are shown is particularly useful in getting an unequivocal location.  

 

Alice appointed Thomas Harrison of Glutton to be the overseer of her will.  He was a yeoman whose name appeared on other documents of the period.

 

 

The Will of Alice Wardle 1603

In the name of  god amen: the twelfth daye of Januarie in the year of our lord god one thousand sixe hundred and three I Alice Wardle of Wilshawe in the parish of Alstonfeild in the countie of Stafforde wydowe, sicke in bodie, but of sound and perfect memorie the lorde therefore be praised, doo make & ordayne this my laste will & testament in manner & forme followinge.  First I commende my soule unto almightie god my maker, & creator & unto Jesus Christe my saviour & most merciful redeemer, and I will that my bodie shall be buried in the church yard of Alstonfeild aforesaid.  Item I give & bequeathe unto Elizabeth Wardle & Ann Wardle the daughters of William Wardle my sone twoo kyne & foure ewes which I will to be putt forthe to there uses by the said William.  Item I give & bequeathe unto Alice Wardle the daughter of John Wardle my sone one cowe & foure ewes which I will to be putt for the to her use by the said John.  Item I give & bequeathe Calife Relland(?) one ewe.  Item I give & bequeathe unto Joane my daughter one cowe.  Item my debtes, legacies & funeral expence being paid, & discharged I give & bequeathe unto William Wardle & John Wardle my sones all, & singular the reste of my goodes & cattell & chattels whatsoend equallie to be devyded betwixte them.  Item I ordayne constitute & make William Wardle my said sone the sole executor of this my last will & testament revoking &  disawillinge(?)  all former willes, legacies, & bequests whatsoever.  Item I desire & pa.elie  praise Thomas Harrison of Glutton to be supervisor of this my last will & testament to see the same executed and performed according to the tenor of the same as my wish is hee will doo.

 

Theise being witnes

Thomas Brunte

William Chesshyre Snr

Humfr Goodwyn

 

Debtes owinge unto the aforesaid testatrix

In primis William Buxton of Chelmorton

Item Humfrey Wheeldon of Fairefeild

Item Thomas Rogers of Earlesternedalle

Item Ottywell Goodwyn of the same town

Item Roger Wardle Jnr de Earlesbooth

Item William Wardle de gryndleston in Earlesbooth

Item Lawrence Wardle de Lee coate

Item Olliver Dalle de howe green

Item John Bennet de winter side

Item William Wardle de Wilshawe

Item Roger Froste now or late of Brydle parish

Item Roger Alexander Snr de parke house

     for the half of the cowe pasture at the Nabbe

     between Maye Daye & Martlemas

Item George Crychlowe de Neild

Item Humfrey Goodwyn

Item John Naden de hollescloughe

Item Thomas Wilshawe de greene sides

Item Margery wife of John Wheeldon late of Knatt dale

Item Mr Raphe Bostocke

Item Arthur Wardle

Item James Naden of hollescloughe

Item Richard Sutton

      Suma   £43 17s 1d

 

 

 

Inventorie of Alice Wardle June 1604

The inventorie of all and singular the goodes and chattel bothe quicke & dead moveable, & immoveable of Alice Wardle of Wilshaw in the parish of Alstonfeild in the countie of Stafford widowe late deceased, seene & praised the nynthe daye of June An dom 1604: by us John Bennet, William Cheshyre and Richard Redferne.

 

In pr 9 bullocks

Item 9 litle keyne

Item 5 heifers

Item 4 stirkes

Item 4 weaning calves

Item one bull

Item 2 mares

Item 2 coltes

Item 60 sheepe

Item 2 swyne

Item pullen

Item pewter & brasse

Item Iron wares & all implements of husbandrie

Item boardes, formes & trestles & all treene ware

Item 3 paire of bedstockes

Item 2 cheares

Item 3 cooafers

Item Beddynge & all napperie ware

Item Oate meale & maulte

Item whitmente?

Item 3 sacks

Item Flesh at the roof

Item 4 Cuishions

Item a baxton

Item her repell (apparel)

 

Suma  £65 19s 4d

.

Debts owing to Alice Wardle June 1604

Debtes owinge unto the aforesaid decedent

In primis William Buxton of Chelmorton

Item Humfrey Wheeldon of Fairefeild

Item Thomas Rogers of Earlesternedalle

Item Ottywell Goodwyn of the same town

Item Roger Wardle Jnr de Earlesbooth

Item William Wardle de gryndleston in Earlesbooth

Item Lawrence Wardle de Lee coate

Item Olliver Dalle de howe green

Item John Bennet de winter side

Item William Wardle de Wilshawe

Item Roger Froste now or late of Brydle parish

Item Roger Alexander Snr de parke house

     for the half of the cowe pasture at the Nabbe

     between Maye Daye & Martlemas

Item George Crychlowe de Neild

Item Humfrey Goodwyn

Item John Naden de hollescloughe

Item Thomas Wilshawe de greene sides

Item Margaret wife of John Wheeldon of Knatt dale deceased

Item Mr Raphe Bostocke

Item William Aston

Item James Naden

Item Richard Sutton

 

      Suma   £43 17s 1d

 

Inventory £65 49s 4d

Debts       £43 17s 1d

Total       £109 16s 5d

 


Will of Edward Plant the Younger 1609

 

The will was made on the 11th August in the seventh year of the reign of James 1, referred to in the will as Jacobi.  At the time of writing, Edward’s father (Edward) and, by implication, his mother were alive.  He names his wife Joane, daughter Margaret, brother William and brother in law Richard Arnefield all still living. 

 

Edward lived at Duncotte greave which is now called Duncows Grove, it was first recorded in 1504 and lies close to the River Manifold.   His landlord was William Jackson of Stanshope, the property was later acquired by the Harpur family and was definitely owned by them in 1646.  (A Plant was still living there in 1714; Widow Plant was paying £1 rent for a tenement at Duncoatesgreave)

 

The Inventory was taken on the 17th August, only 6 days after the will was made and both the will and inventory were written by Geo Goodwyn Snr.  Edward named his wife Joane and Richard Arnefield as executors.  However, probate was granted to Richard and Edward’s daughter Margaret, presumably Joane had died sometime between Edward's death and the granting of probate.  The date of probate isn’t recorded.

 

From the Alstonefield parish registers: Edward Plant married Elizabeth Arnefield 21st July 1602,

He married Joan Clulow 19th January 1608.

Edward Plant was buried August 13th,1609 2 days after the will was made.

 

In the will, Edward left Margaret “one cofer which was her mothers”. This may suggest that Joane was his second wife and therefore Margaret’s stepmother.  A cofer (coffer) is a strong, often large, box for holding valuables (Latin  - cophinus {coffin} and Greek Kophinos – basket).  An ‘ark’ is a chest or box (Latin arca - chest) and is still used as a farming term e.g. pig ark or poultry ark.  Thomas Plant and Thomas Redfearne, both named as overseers of Edwards will, and Richard Arnefield are recorded in the 1646 Harpur Estate Rentals.

 

Will of Edward Plant

 

In the name of God amen the eleventh daye of August anno dm 1609. And anno regnorum Jacobi ruler Anglia Francia et Hibina septimo. Ac Scocio quadragesimo tenrio.  I Edward Plant the Younger of Duncotte greave in the parish of Alstonfeild in the countie of Stafford husbandman sicke in bodie but sounde and perfecte in remembrance thankes be given to God, do ordayne and make this my last will and testament in Mannor and forme followinge viz:  First I give and bequeath my soule unto the hande of Almightie God my Maker Redeemer and Saviour and trusting by faith onelie to be saved and my bodie to be buried in the Church yard of Alstonfeild aforesaid:  First I give and bequeath to Margaret Plant my daughter one cofer which was her mothers and one meale ark two coverlette three sheete my best briches and my best jerkin my best hatt and all my shert bande: Item my mynde and wish is that I being honestlie brought home and my debtes and funeral expenses discharged of my whole  goods then the rest of all my goode and cattells booth quicke and dead to be devyded in this sort that is to saye one thridd part to Joane my wife:  and two partte therof to Margaret my daughter:  Item I ordayne and make Joane my said wife and Richard Arnefeild my brother in law the true and lawful executors of this my last will and testament and to the same fully executed as their will make ansered   thoerof at the Judgement Daye and I require and appoint Thomas Redfearne of Forfeildhead and Thomas Plant of Foefide oversiers of the same.

 

Debtes which the testator oweth

 

Imprimis To George Goodwyn Snr

Item To Thomas Chesshire

Item To Thomas Bradburie

Item To Thomas Hyne

Item To Roger Bagshaw

Item To my landlord William Jackson

of Stanhope

Item to William Plant my brother

four pounds to be paid to him

within one yeare after the decease

of my father and mother

 

Debtes owing to the Testator

Imprimis Raphe Clowloo}

              John Clowloo}

Item Roger Froste

 

Thise beinge witnes

Thomas Chesshire

Thomas Redfearne

Thomas Plant

Goodwyn Snr

 

In Latin, probate granted to Richard Arnefeild and pro Margaret Plant, daughter.

 

Inventory of Edward Plant 17th August 1609

 

The inventorie of all and singular the goods and cattell booth quicke and deade, moveable and immoveable of Edward Plant the younger of Duncotte greave in the parish of Alstonfeild in the countie of Stafford deceased and praised the 17th daye of August 1609 by us Richard Plant, Raphe Clowloo, Thomas Chesshire and Thomas Redfearne.

 

Imprimis Three kyne three hayfers three calfes

Item one old horse

Item nineteen old sheepe and eleaven lambes

Item one leif swine

Item the corne upon the grounde

Item the hay gotten and for to gett

Item plowes, wheeles, harrowes, ockes and}

other househould stuffe of woodd}

Item pewter and brasse

Item beddinge linen and woollen

Item lyme upon the ground

Item iron wares

Item butter and cheese and flach?}

at the rouffe?}

Item The fuell

Item foure poundes of wole

Item his apparel

Item the money in his purse

   Suma totalis £27 9s 0d


 


 Frances Bennet 1620

 

Will of Frances Bennett of Winterside 1620

This is a photo of Winterside in 2008.  There was a house recorded here in 1400 and the site was still occupied in the early 20th century.

 

Frances Bennett made his will on the 20th May 1620 and the inventory was taken on 3rd June 1620.  I don’t know who wrote the will, Frances did not sign it or even put his mark to it but the inventory was written by George Goodwyn (or as sometimes appears, Goodwin).  I recognise the handwriting which always appears to be written in great haste! George Goodwyn was the agent for Sir John Harpur and his name appears on the rentals.  He and his father George, together leased a mill in Longnor from Sir John.  Sometime during 1645 (civil war) George seemed to lose his stewardship to Sir John and this position was taken over by William Wardle of Boosley or Boosely Grange.

 

It would appear from the will that Frances Bennett had a wife Agnis, mother Joane, sister Ann and brother John all living at the time.  Strangely Frances’ assets are valued at nearly £28 and his debts were around £34 but there was no comment made.

 

 

The Will

In the name of god amen the five and twentieth daye of Maie the in the yeares of the raigne of our soveraigne lorde James by the grace of god kinge of England France and Ireland the eighteinthe and of Scotland the True and fysteithe defender of the faithe yr 1620.  I Frances Bennett of Wyntersyde within the parish of Alstonfeilde and countie of Stafford husbandman somewhat diseased in bodie but of good and perfecte remembrance I praise you for the same doo ordaine and make this my present will and testament in manner and forme followinge.  First I commend my soule unto almighty god my maker and to Jesus Christ my onlye saviour and redeemer moste steadfastly believing that throughe his most precious deathe and passion I shall have remission and forgiveness of all my sinnes.  And my bodie after this transitorye lyfe I commend to the earth to bee buried in the church of Alstonfeilde.  Item my will and mynde that my syster Ann Bennett shall have yearly 39s un.. to be paid unto her by my executor at the feast dayes of midsomer and the purification of our blessed ladie called candlemas day yearlie during the natural lyfe of Joane Bennett mother to the said An Bennett in full recompence and discharge of all such mentainance and keepinge as the said Frances Bennett is charged withal for the said Ann  And after the decease of the said Joane Bennett my said mother my mynd and will is that the said Ann Bennett my sister shall have for her said menteynance during her natural lyffe all those two closes called the barne feilde and the cowe haye beneathe the said barn feilde and one little croft andjoininge to the said barne feilde from the west end of a litle coat standing in the said crofte  and soe to be parted? with the oulde fence?  to the Rickstidd  And my mynde and will is that John Bennett my brother shalle sipinser? for the mentynance of my said sister  Item I give and bequethe unto Agnis my wyffe all and singular my goods cattells chattels househould stuffe and debts whatsoever as well mouvable and imouvable  quick and dead  And I  do heirby constitute ordaine and make the aforesaid Agnis my wyffe the  (damaged/missing)   of this my present will and testament  And doo heirby frustrate and make void all my former wills legacies and bequeathes whatsoever.

 

These beinge wytnesses                       Debtes owing by the said Frances Bennett

William Rogers                                   Imprimis To Sir John Harpur knight

John Bennett                                      to Roger Chadwick of okenclough

William Bagnalde                                 To John Cowper of heaton

                                                          To John Bennett my brother

                                                          at the first of September 1620

                                                          To George Harrison de Loe

                                                                   Totall £34 4s

 

                                                          In Latin – probate granted

                                                                   R Master

 

 

Inventory

 

The inventorie of all and singular the goodes and cattells both quicke and dead mouveable and imouvable of Francis Bennett of Winterside in the parish of Alstonfeilde in the countie of Stafford husbandman late deceased and praised the thirde day of June 1620 by us George Goodwyn William Rogers, Roger Tullows and Robert Tullows

 

Imprimis Three kine

Item Two twinter hayfers

Item Two twinter bullocks

Item Two yealinge calves

Item one oxe

Item one little mare

Item twentie and three sheepe

Item the pullen

Item Beddinge Lynen and Wollen

Item Pewter and Brass

Item wooden warre and all other implemente of husbandrie

Item iron warre

Item Meale and mault

Item Butter and cheese

Item The corne upon the grounde

Item The s?

Item his apparell and money in his purse

    Totall £27 19s 2d

 

Debtes which the deceadent oweth

Imprimis To Sir John Harpur knight

Item To Roger Chadwick of Ockenclough

Item To John Cowper

Item To John Bennett

Item To George Harrison

     Totall £34 4s


 

Will of Roger Yate 31st October 1648

Lichfield Record Office B/C/11

 

This will has been a little ‘challenging’ to say the least.  So, my apologies for some incomplete words - you have the reference and any amendments or suggestions will be gratefully received!

 

Background

Roger Yate lived at Moskar (now Mosscarr) in Hollinsclough.  Mosscarr is sited on the right hand side of the New Road built in 1833/34 which is the straight road leading from the Longnor/Flash road into Hollinsclough village.  Moscure was first recorded in 1402 and it is thought that the site was important for the production of reeds which were used for thatching. The Yate family of Mosscarr  is mentioned several times on this site:

1627 Rental - Elizabeth Yate widow

1633/34 Senior Survey – Widow Yates had 108 acres

1651-54 Rental - Thomas Yate was the tenant

 

Synopsis of the Will

At the time of writing, Roger was the tenant of half the farm and his widowed mother Elizabeth, was the tenant of the other half.  His wife was An, the will implies that she was his second wife and not the mother of his four sons who were called Thomas, William, Brian and Isaac.  The four sons were under 21 years old.  In addition to leaving the farm to Thomas and willing certain items he left William £40, Brian £40 and Isaac £60. 

(I quite like the idea of having a “throwne chayre”.)

 

The Will was made 31st October 1648 and the Inventory taken 8th December 1648.

 

*New information - son Isaac was buried on the same day as his father, 7 December 1648.

 

Will

In the name of god amen the last day of October ano dm 1648 I Roger Yate of Moskar in the county of Stafford yeoman sick and diseased in body sound and perfect in memory praised be god for the same.  I declare and make this my last will and testament in maner and forme following.  First and principally I bequeathe and commend my soule to almighty god my creator, Jesus Christ my redeemer the holy ghost my comforter trusting onely through the merits of Christ Jesus to have all my sinns forgiven me, and to enjoy everlasting life in the kingdom of heaven  Item I will that my body be buried in the church at Alstonfeild as near unto the place where my loving wife lyeth buryed as conveniently can be.  First I give devise assigne and bequeath unto Thomas Yate my eldest son that halfe of the messuage, howses and lands called Moskar aforesaid is now in my possession.  And after the decease of Elizabeth my mother I give unto him the said Thomas the tenants right and possession of all the whole farme.  Also I give unto the said Thomas all my husbandry ware whatsoever and the great chaire and the farme  and hang board and season? .ooles two paire of bedstockes, two seiled?, cofers, and all my goods at Birchenclyff  And I give to him the said Thomas all the bedding which was his mothers provided that he have two paires of sheets.  Also I give to the said Thomas all the seete? boards in the house.  Item whereas I am bound to leave at my decease to William Yate my younger son the sume of twenty pounds.  I give and bequeath to the said William the said sume of twenty pounds and twenty pounds more in all the sume of fourty pounds of lawful money of England.  Item I give to the said William one paire of bedstockes, my least cofer, my biggest box, my lesser throwne chayre and my cradle.  Item I give and bequeath to my two younger sones Brian and Isaac the sume of an hundred pounds of lawful money of England which to Brian forty pounds and to Isaac three score pounds and my will is that my executors shall imploy the said (sones) till they come to their sevrall ages of twenty and one yeares and I will that there issues and profits of the said ……. shall yearly towards the maintenance of the said Brian and Isaac and of An my wife.  Also I give to An my wife all the rest of my bedding and all my brass and pewter and treine ware except my great pewter dish which I give to Isaac my son.  Also I give to Brian my boarded chaire.  Also I give to my wife my biggest plane cofer and two boxes which she brought with her and my wea.. arke  I give my saddle and bridle, boots, spurs, and all my wearing apparel to Thomas my son except my great coate which I give to my son William.  Item I nominate and appoint my brother in law John Mellor and my brother William Yate to be executors of this my last will and testament and I desire Thomas Adshead the elder of Birchencliffe to be ordseer of my two older sons and William Jepson? of Capestone to be ordseer of my two younger sons.  In testemony whereof I have hereunto put my hand and seale.

 

Those being witnesses

Elizabeth Yate       George Goodwin

Edith Yate

 

 

Debts owing to the testator (dictated by Roger Yate)

 

 

£

s

d

John Frost at Mayday

21

6

0

John Swindell of Disley

Due at Michas (Michaelmas)

12

8

0

John Mellor of Butterton

At Michas next

10

16

0

Thomas Mellor of Butterton

10

0

0

William Chappell now due

9

0

0

Thomas Naden paid

1

2

0

Richard Redfearne

0

2

0

William Foxton

1

10

0

Robt Worthington

0

16

0

John Mellor of Churchpoole?

0

19

11

And upon a reckoning about

0

10

0

More owing me by Robert Worthinton

0

9

0

 

69

0

11

 

My will and minde is that my

son William be paid as followeth

 

John Swindell

10

0

0

John Mellor

10

0

0

John Frost

20

0

0

 

40

0

0

 

And not use shalle ………… and besides to be paid to my executors to the use of my two younger sons

 

Below this in another hand and in Latin it ‘roughly’ says:

Carswall 17 May 1649 that Thomas, William and Brian were being educated as per their father’s will.  No mention of Isaac.

 

There is also another note, again in Latin headed Leek 10 March 1648 (before the will was made).  It relates to guardianship of Rogers sons and mentions  Isaac Yate, Robert Yate (uncle) William Yate and Brian Yate.  Robert Yate of Tunnstead in countie of Stafford, yoman and George Mellor of Butterton in the countie of Stafford yoman are named,

 

 

Inventory of Roger Yate 8th December 1648

The inventory of Roger Yate taken the 8th day of December by Geo Goodwin, son Tho, Olliver Mellor and …….. Yate

 

His apparel and money in his purse

2

0

0

5 kine

20

0

0

One oxe

5

10

0

3 incalf heifers

9

0

0

And twinter bullock

2

6

8

2 calves

2

6

8

19 sheepe of all sorte

4

0

0

One liefe swine

1

10

0

corne

3

6

8

hay

5

0

0

Butter and cheese

7

10

0

 

62

10

0

                                            Debts

69

0

0

 

131

10

0

Pewter and brasse

1

10

0

Bedding linen and wollen

5

0

0

Trine ware of all sorte

Chares stooles formes boards cheese boards

Bedstockes cofers …. arke

5

10

0

Husbandrie ware of all sortes

0

13

4

Manure?

0

2

0

 

12

15

4

                                                        Totall

144

5

4

 

Strangely, there is no mention of a horse and yet Roger willed his saddle, bridle and spurs to his son Thomas – not much use if he’d got nothing to put them on!  There does appear to be a lot of cheese.  In 1625 the prices at Southampton Market were:

a lb of best cheese 21/2d

a lb of sweet new butter 31/2d

 

There is a final page dated May 1649.  At the top is a written obligation, in latin.  The second paragraph is in English.  A competent Judge Walter Littleton grants An Yate relict of Roger Yate administration of the estate and also the tuition and education of the three minors – Thomas, William and Brian Yate.  (Presumably Isaac had died)


The Will and Inventory of James Nealor (Naylor) 1669

 

This is the first will that I have transcribed where the personality of the man comes shining down through the centuries. 

 

James Nealor was a man of some substance, he had (presumably rented) three houses in Hollinsclough, the Dwelling House, The Pearle House and the Banke House as well as a number of fields.  His wife must have died and he had one child, a daughter called Anne.  In all probability he came from Monyash because that is where he wished to be buried; he also had family (nephews) in Flagg.

 

His main concerns were to ensure that Anne was properly cared for (“with wholesome meate drinke and lodging washing & apparel befitting her degree & calling”) but he also left lots of bequests to children of “5 shillings apiece”.  One of his bequests to Anne was “And all my linin and woollen which shall be uncut att my decease”.  Does anyone know what the “uncut” means?

 

He refers to his friends as “wellbeloved Frends George Dale of Moniash gent and John White of Dowal yeoman to be overseers”.  What a truly delightful way of describing ones friends.

 

It was not uncommon at the time to leave sheep to children.  Firstly it gave the child something of value but, just as importantly, the child was encouraged to care for and learn the basic rules and responsibilities of animal husbandry.  He left “unto Grace mycoke his daughter (of Robert) six sheepe”.

 

Regarding the three properties, I don’t know where the dwelling house was and Naylor was not a ‘local’ name but I think that the Banke House was opposite where the Chapel now is.  As for The Pearle House, well, I am sure that that was opposite where the school now stands. There is an Old English word pyrle with the meaning "spring". This word will often end up in later spellings as "pearl".  There was a spring just opposite the school, children used to use it in living memory and its position ties in perfectly with all the associated field names. (I cannot prove the exact location but when I went to look for the spring, I had isolated the probable site to about 30 yards and I didn’t know that there used to be a spring there.  I rest my case!)  Importantly too, the will refers to The Pearle House – not a cottage, so the implication was that it was more substantial than a cottage.

 

James Nealor also says “I give unto Henry Carder five shillings”.  I wonder if this has anything to do with Carder Green in Longnor? 

 

Extract of the Will

 

 

James Nealor

Will made 3rd December 1669, Inventory taken 6th December 1670 and proved at Carswell 13 April 1671

Lichfield Record Office

In the name of god Amen the thyrd day of December in the one and twentieth year of the raigne of our soveraigne lord Charles the Second by the grace of God Kinge of England Scotland France and Ireland defender of the faith this Anno dom 1669 I James Nealor of Holesclough in the Parish of Alstonfeild in the countie of Stafford yeoman being somewhat sick & disseased in bodie but of sound mind & perfect remembrance praised be god for the same I declare & make this my last will and testament in manner & forme following first and principally I bequeath command my soule into the hands of Almighty god my creator Jesus Christ my redeemer & the holy ghost my comforter trusting through the ?lone merits of jesus Christ to have all my sinnes pardoned & to enjoy everlasting life in the kingdom of heaven also I will that my bodie be buried in the chappell of moniash in the Countie of Darbie in such a meete & convenient place as my executor shall thinke fitt &  whereas I the testator did by constance? assure certain parcells of my lands in Holesclough in the countie of Stafford aforesaid to feafing? in trust for the paying of one hundred pounds to Anne Nealor my daughter which one hundred pounds was paid to the said Anne my daughter accordingly and the sd Anne delivered the same to mee the testator backe again to be imployed att my discretion for her maintenance In consideration of her maintenance  I also give unto the said Anne the present of one twentie pounds to be paid to her at after my decease by my executors hereafter named  And shee to dispose of the same at her own will and pleasure  And if the said Anne leave ani child or children of her bodie living at her decease then my will & mynd is that the said sume of a hundred pounds to be paid by my executors to suche child or children as are living at her decease & further it is my will & mynd that my Executors shall maintain & keepe the said Anne my daughter during her life with wholesome meate drinke and lodging washing? & apparel befitting her degree & calling and if the said Anne shall refuse or dislike her said mainteanance then my will & mynd is that my executor shall pay her yearly & every yeare      during her life the sume of eight pounds of lawful money of England quarterlie that is to say everie quarter of a yeare fortie shillings into her one hands  And in case the said sume of eight pounds be not paid as aforesaid that then my will and mynd is that the said Anne my daughter shall have and enjoy during her naturall life these parcels of land hereafter named viz the dwelling house the oxe house the pearle house the neathermost Bay of the barne the Greene Field the meadow Spott theareunto adjoining the Pingle the Rushid Close the Greate Carr the littell Carr and new Close  Allso I give and bequeathe unto the said Anne my daughter one feather bed Foure blanketes three coverlids Two pere of sheetes Two pillowes and one boulster  And all my linin and woollen which shall be uncut att my decease  Allsoe I give unto the said Anne Two ketteles one pott one peare of iron toungs & one iron grate  Allso my will and mynd is that what bounes I have allreadie given her shee shall in no waies be hindred of neather from the sheep which are are now in her owne possession and conserning the rest of my messuages lands and primises lying within the fields & precincts of Holesclough aforesaid I give devise & bequeath unto james Nealor of Flagg in the countie of Darbie my nephew his heires and assigns for ever Except the banke house and croft thereunto belonging which I reserve to my owne pp use to dispose on whome I please before my decease. Item I give unto Richard Nealor the elder of moniash my nephew one Cow which is in William Poyntons hande of Longnor in lew of twentie shillings left unto him by Elizabeth Goodwin of holesclough lately deceased  Item I give unto the said Richard Nealor one eight part of all my possessions & meares of ground lying & belonging to Ludyate and Milne Close Ground  Item I give unto the said Richard Nealor and Anne his wief and to theer three children everie one five shillings a peece  Item I give into Robert Mycock six ewes Also forgi.e him twelve stryke of oates and one quarter of beefe which he oweth mee for  Item I give to his five children every one of them five shillings a peece  Item I give unto Grace mycoke his daughter six sheepe  Item I give unto Robert mycoke wife one cow  Item I give unto the three children of Arthure Goodwine which hee had by his former wife five shillings a peece  Item I give unto Alice Taylor & to every one of her children five shillings a peece  Item I give unto my cozen Rodger Parker five shilling  Item I give unto marie nealor and unto her twoo children Five shillings a peece  Item I give unto john whitesson Five shillings  Item I give unto Henry Carder five shillings  Item I give unto George Goodwyn the younger of Longner the sum of tenne shillings  Allso that after my funeral Expences and the said legasies in this my present will are suffitiently discharged and paide all the rest of my goods, Cattels & Chattels whatsoever s?mn bequeathed I do wholly give and bequeath unto the said james Nealor my Nephew whome I make and ordaine my sole Executor of this my last will and testament revokeing & disannulling & forsakeing all former wills whatsoever

Ad I desire my wellbeloved Frends George Dale of Moniash gent and John White of Dowal yeoman to be overseers to this my will hopeing the will see the same performed as my trust is in them In testimonie wheareof I have heareunto putt my hand and seale the day and yeare aforesaid

 

Sealed published & declared

to be my last will & testament

in the presence of

 

William Brunley (probably Brindley)

George Goodwyn

 

lykewaiss I give unto William Nealor and Richard Nealor and john Nealor and Robert Nealor five shillings a peece and twentie shillings to Richard Nealor which hee saith was oweing to his Father

 

The marke & seale

of the testatore

 

Carswell 13 Aprilis 1671

 

The Inventory

At last, someone has a horse.  So far wills have referred to saddles but they have never mentioned the horse!

Doubtless someone who studies dialects would make a truly erudite comment about a “feberbed”.

Note the ‘throwaway’ statement of “all other things not formerly mentioned” – I shall have to remember that one.  A bit like saying “according to oral tradition”!!!

 

Inventory of James Nealor

A true & perfect inventory of all the goods cattells & chattels quicke & dead moveable & immoveable of James Naylor of Hollisclough in the County of Stafford lately deceased prysed the 6th daye of December 1670 by William Platts Hennery Gold Thomas Nadin & Richard Nayler as followeth

 

 

£

s

d

Impr purse apparel horse & saddle

10

00

0

It 9 kine

20

00

0

It 1 heyfer 2 stirkes

04

00

0

It 32 old sheepe 9 hoggs

05

00

0

It corne haye maynure & fuell

10

00

0

It 1 swine

01

05

0

It 10 blanketts

01

00

0

It 4 coverletts

00

13

4

It 1 feberbed

00

06

8

It 2 chaffbeds

00

03

0

It 1 fether boulster 3 pillows

00

05

0

It 5 paire of sheets 1 table clouth

00

18

0

It 6 cushians

00

03

0

It 8 sacks 1 winnowing sheet

00

16

6

It 3potts 2 pans 1 masland kettle

02

10

0

It 6 pewter dishes 2 scumers 2 candlestick 2 salts & spoones

00

10

0

It 3 kettles 1 iron pott 2 skelletts

00

10

0

It 1 meale arke 1 cubord 4 chests

01

04

0

It 3 paire of bedstocks 1 table 1 forme

00

06

8

It Butter & cheese

01

15

0

It Bacon

00

03

4

It Chaires boards & all other wood ware

01

00

0

It 5 stone of wooll

02

00

0

It Husbandry ware & all iron ware

01

00

0

It money owing upon specallty

06

00

0

It all other debts

10

00

0

It all other things not formerly mentioned

00

00

06

                                                  the summ is

81

9

6

Thomas Naden junior

William Yeatts

Hen Gould Snr

Richard Nealor

 


 

Will and Inventory of Edmund Naden of Hollinsclough 1686/87

Edmund Naden lived in Hollinsclough, he had three brothers – Francis and Thomas, still living, and another brother (name unknown) who had died but had left a widow Joan, also living in Hollinsclough.  Presumably Edmund did not have any wife or child living at the time as he left a shilling to each of his two brothers and six pounds ten shillings to sister in law Joan.  This was due from a bond owed to him by brother Francis.  He also left all his other goods to Joan whom he made his sole executrix.  Perhaps he was concerned that she had no means of support, was fond of her, didn’t like his brothers or maybe she lived in his house.  He did have two beds and a truckle bed, not a requisite for a single man of a certain age?!

There are two areas of specific interest in the inventory. 

Edmund Naden did not earn his living from any agricultural activity – there were no items of husbandry, no livestock, no fields etc. 

He did have a selection of fabrics plus “two petty coates for women to wear” (12).  He must have been selling his goods as a chapman/pedlar and, presumably for some years. This must be one of the earliest records of a chapman in Hollinsclough.   

Notes:

Linsey (17) – is a coarse woollen or linen fabric, sometimes referred to as linsey-woolsey

Coverlid  (2) - variation of a coverlet(usually a cover for warmth that does not cover the pillow

Bedhilling (5) - is a bed cover or quilt

Bedstocks (21) -  part of the frame of a bed 

Troggell (21) - a truckle, a little low bed

Joycon? (13) – anyone any ideas?

Troagges (13) – as above?

 

The Will

In the name of God Amen the fourth day of November in the year of our Lord God one thousand six hundred eighty and six I Edmund Naden; of Hollescloughe in the parish of Allstonfeild and County of Stafford husbandman; being weake in body but sound and perfect in mind and memory; thanks be to God for it, knowing the certainty of death but the tyme thereof to be most uncertaine doe ordain and make this my last will and testament in manner & forme following. First I commit my soule unto Almighty God my Creator and unto Jesus Christ my redeemer by whose merits I trust to have eternal life; and my body to bee buried at the discretion of my executrix heareafter named.

Item  And as to my worldly estate I dispose as followeth   Imprimis I give and bequeathe unto Joan Naden widow of Hollescloughe my sister in Law; the sum of six pounds & ten shillings which my brother Francis Naden of Longnor oweth unto me upon bonds  Item I also give & bequeathe into Joan Naden all the rest of my goods whatsoever moveable or immoveable whatsoever she hath in her hands at present or what is in the hands of any other that was ever called myne I freely give & bequeathe unto Joan Naden aforesaid;

Item  I give unto Francis Naden my brother the sum of one shilling: Item I give unto Thomas Naden my brother the sum of one shilling

Item I nominate and ordaine Joan Naden sister in law my sole executrix of this my last will and testament revokeinge all other will or wills, deed or deeds of gift whatsoever formerly by me made I renounce them all whatsoever.

In witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and seale the day and year above written:

Sealed & de..ced                                 Edmund Naden

in the presence of:                                       his marke & seale

Francis Chapman

junior his marke

Humphrey Rogers

his marke

Francis Chapman Senior

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extract from the inventory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inventory of Edmund Naden  January the 21st day 1686 (1687)

We whose names are here under subscribed have valued, prised & praised the goods and chattels of Edmund Naden of Hollesclough late deceased.

 

Imprimis

 

 

£

s

d

1

His prse & apparel; prised to

 

6

8

2

Two coverlids valued & prised to

 

10

0

3

One featherbed & one pillow to

 

5

0

4

Six blankets valued & prised to

 

15

0

5

One bedhilling valued to

 

5

0

6

One red bedhilling prised to

 

5

0

7

One chaffe bed prised to

 

1

6

8

Foure paire of sheets valued & prised to

 

12

0

9

Two tables clothes prised to

 

1

10

10

Two yards and an halfe of red dyed carrsey? Prised to

 

6

0

11

Three yards & an halfe of linement? Colour dyed carrsey? to

 

7

0

12

Two petty coates for women to weare prysed to

 

10

0

13

One payre of joycon? horse troagges? Valued to

 

1

6

14

One broad jycon? and a payre of pot rackes prysed to

 

1

6

15

Two chests valued & prysed to

 

15

0

16

One scaine turnell? valued & prysed to

 

5

6

17

Four yards of linsey valued & prysed to

 

3

0

18

One pillow & Bagg valued & prysed to

 

1

6

19

Three corne sackes valued & prysed to

 

7

6

20

One bond of six pounds and ten shillings valued & prysed to

6

10

0

21

One paire of bedstocks and a little troggell prysed to

 

2

0

 

The total sum is twelve pounds twelve shillings & sixpence

12

12

6

 

Witness our hands the day and year above written

George Redferne                                Thomas Chambers

his marke as witness praiser              his marke as witness praiser

 

& Francis Chapman

 

 


 

John Naden 1754

 

In the name of God Amen I John Naden of Wilshaw in the County of Stafford husbandman being in a declining Condition of Body but of sound and Perfect mind and memory Praise be therefore given to Almighty God, do make and ordain this my Present Last Will and Testament in Manner and Form Following that is to say First and Principally I commend my Soul into the Hands of the Almighty God, hoping through the Merits, Death and Passion of My Saviour Jesus Christ to have full and free Pardon & forgiveness of all my sins and to inherit Everlasting Life and my Body I commit to the Earth to be decently buried at the discretion of Executors hereafter named And as touching the disposition of all such Temporal Estate as it hath Pleased Almighty God to bestow upon me, I give and dispose thereof as followeth First I will, that all my Funerall Expences shall be Paid and discharged.  Item I give and bequeath unto my Loving Wife Jane Naden  all my Cattle and Chattels both Husbandry Ware  and all Furniture and Household Goods Whatsoever – and wheresoever- and I do hereby Give and bequeath unto my Son Jonah Naden the Sum of Twenty Pounds of Lawful Money of great brittain to be Paid within the Space of Twelve Months after my decease Also my Will and Pleasure is to give and bequeath unto My Beloved grandchildren of Thos Tunnicliffe Late Deceased the Sum of Twenty five pounds to be Equally divided amongst them five and if any One die before this money Comes to be Paid for its Share to be distributed to the Rest that Remain & I also Order that Thomas hine & My Beloved Wife aforesaid Being Join’d Executors that they distribute the money amongst these Children Jane, Sarah, Jonah & John and Mary Tunnicliffe according as they have need  item to Thomas Hine I Leave him Five Pounds for helping and assisting the Widow in her adffairs aforesaid Likewise I give and bequeath Unto My Eldest Son Zephaniah Naden the sum of Five Pounds If he be contented therewith, if not I Leave Him nothing item I give unto My Daughter Parthenia One Shilling All the rest Residue and remainder of my Personal Estate Household Goods Wearing Apparel whatsoever and where soever I give unto my Beloved Wife aforesaid And Farther that the Survivor shall have the deceased Legacy or Legacy’s Paid to them  Lastly I appoint the said Thos Hine and My Beloved Wife hoping they will Perform the trust I repose in them & I do hereby revoke Dissannul and make Void all former & Other Wills by me heretofore made and do declare this to be my Last Will and Testament.  In Witness whereof I the said John Naden the Testator have hereunto Set my Hand and Seal this Seventh Day of January Anno Domini 1754/

Sealed Signed and declared to be                  Note I have Named Jane Naden

the Last Will and Testament of            to be sole tenant of the sd Premises of

the Testator John Naden in the            Willshaw Farm and in full Possession of

Presence of Us                                              all during her Life etc?

 

William Olliver                                   John Naden

 

William Sleigh Junior                                   John Naden

 

 

Next Page a codicil

 

Note that If the Said Jane Naden by any means Shoud marry again it is farther Collected by me John Naden then so Thos Hine pays to her the sum of Twenty Pounds And take the Household Furniture into his own Possession and he may make sale of ye said Household Stuff and Pay himself the aforesd  Twenty Pounds and Return the Remainder of the money that they are sold for Equally into the hands of Zephaniah Jonah & Parthenia my two sons & Daughter and for them to keep it being their property.

 

Next Page

A Declaration upon oath by Jane Naden the Widow & Executor of John Naden late of of  Wilshaw in the Parish of Alstonfield in the County of Stafford Gover…  & …. touching all Scripts Scroles & Papers purporting? any Will or Codicils of the said  Deceased?  ? this Second Day of July 1754

 

This Exhibitant doth upon her oath declare that the Paper  Existing? Hereto amended is thoroughly  ??, Codicils, Script Scrole in? Paper whatsoever purporting any will of the said John Naden deceased, which hath ?? to her hands  ??   ?? knowledge, Save of except? The original will of the aforesaid deceased which is already exhibited into the registry of this Court ..which will   ??  ?? herself

 

 

A true and perfect Inventory of all and singular the Goods Chattels Credits and personal Estate whatsoever of John Naden late of Wilshaw in the Parish of Alstonfield in the County of Stafford Yeoman deceased which …. His Death have.. come to the hands Possession or … of Jane Naden Widow of the said Deceased follows to Wit.

  

 

£

s

d

The Deceaseds Ready Money in the House at his death

8

15

6

The wearing Apparels

 

 

 

Two old coats 6s & one great coat 8s

 

14

0

Three old waistcoats 4s 6d one white waistcoat 3s one pair of breeches 2s

 

9

6

Boots and spurs 5s two hats hose? Shoes 4s

 

9

0

One horse

6

0

0

One old mare

2

0

0

One saddle and bridle

 

10

0

One side saddle 2s pillion & cloth 2s

 

4

0

One t..ched? cow in calf

4

0

0

One dun cow in calf

4

0

0

One ??? cow in calf

3

10

0

Another ???? cow in calf

4

0

0

One ?? ??  cow in calf ??

3

10

0

Three barren cows worth one with another

9

0

0

Four stirks worth £2 apiece

8

0

0

Two calves worth one with another

2

5

0

Sixteen loads of coarse hay at ten shillings a load

8

0

0

Six quarter of ordinary black oats at 10s a quarter

3

0

0

Three sheep at 4s apiece

 

12

0

One swine

2

10

0

One plow 2s/6d one harrow s3/6d

 

6

0

Six sacks 6s six old forks 2s

 

8

0

One little ladder 1s one old sled 1s

 

2

0

Gearing for two har??

 

6

0

Two pack saddles with want?? and girths

 

7

0

One iron crow 1s/6d  one mattock 1s

 

2

6

Two shovels 2s/6d two dung forks 2s od

 

4

6

One ax 1s one turf spades 6d

 

1

6

One bed? standing in the kitchen}

 

8

0

Chamber and one bed ?illing}

 

 

 

Four blankets 2s/6d apiece

 

10

0

Two sheets at 5s one chaff bolster one chaff bed? 5s

 

10

0

 

74

14

6

 

 

 

£

s

d

One pair of bedstocks 5s and hangings thereto 7s 6d

 

12

6

The? bed board and matt

 

2

0

Eight hundred of cheeses at £1 3s 6d a hundred

9

8

0

One feather bolster & two pillarses? weight 17lb at 6d per lb

 

8

6

One a?? at5s chairs 5s ones wool weel 1s

 

11

0

Two cheese binders at 6 four pounds? wool 1s 6d

 

2

0

In the house chamber one cupboard at

 

6

0

One Box 4s? five pairs of old sheets

 

11

0

Two pillow drawers

 

2

0

In the parlour chamber the largest bed one coverlet

 

8

0

Four Blankets 2s apiece two sheets 3s

 

11

0

One chaff bed 3s one chaff bolster 2s

 

5

0

The bedstocks 5s with bord? and matt 1s/6d

 

6

6

One little bed in the parlour chamber with two coverlids

 

12

0

Two blankets 3s two sheets 3s

 

6

0

One chaff bed 2s/6d one chaff bolster 1s/6d

 

4

0

One pair of bedstocks 2s & matts 6d

 

2

6

Two barrels ?? 1s 6d a barrel

 

3

0

Two pairs of w?? at

 

2

6

In the parlour one bed with one coverlid

 

9

0

Four blankets at 2s apiece two sheets at 3s

 

11

0

One chaff bed 3s two chaff bolsters 3s

 

6

0

One pair of bedstocks 7 hangings thereto

 

15

0

One chest in the parlour 7s one round buffet 2s

 

9

0

Three chairs 3s one little wheel 2s

 

2

0

In the house

 

 

 

Twenty nine pounds of pewter at 8d per lb

 

19

4

One chest 12s the pewter shelf over it 1s/6d

 

13

6

Three china dishes 1s two white plates 6d

 

1

6

One clock

4

0

0

One warming pan

 

4

0

One little cup board 3s one square table 3s

 

6

0

One little tablecloth 1s/6d three ?? napkins 1s/6d

 

3

0

Six sedge bottom chairs 8d apiece

 

4

0

One anthorn? 2s  the grates 7s/6d

 

9

6

Two pair of old tongues 1s 6d}

 

3

6

Iron sweep? 2s}

 

 

 

Two bread irons 2s/6d eighteen iron ?? 2s/6d

 

5

0

 

25

7

4

 

 

£

s

d

Five boards in the house 2s/6d three other boards 1s

 

3

6

Four small tin cans at8d one pair of bellow 1s

 

1

8

One frying pan 8d flesh? fork 3d slices? 4d

 

1

3

One little ba??ettes 1s/6d one salt box 6d

 

2

0

Six knives at 6d forks at 1s one brass ladle 8d

 

2

4

In the kitchen

 

 

0

One brass boiler and backstone

1

0

0

Three iron potts 1s 6d apiece and one saucepan

 

5

6

One cheese press 4s one chafing dish 1s 6d

 

5

6

One ?? table 3s/6d one water trestle 6d

 

4

0

Three old tubs 3s one churn 4s butter bowle

 

8

0

One ?? iron? 1s three cheese fats at 1s apiece

 

4

0

Three shelves in the kitchen 1s one dish at 4d

 

1

4

Six old milk pails 6d apiece one wooden bowle 8d

 

3

8

One do??? 2s one ?ack board 6d

 

2

6

One smoothing iron and two heaters

 

1

6

Five shelves in the buttery 3s 6d smoothing cloths 1s

 

4

6

Ten old milk pans at 1s 3d eight glass bottles 1s 4d

 

2

7

Eight earthen bottles 1s and a few drinking mugs 1s

 

2

0

Debt dues upon bond from Thomas Hines the younger for thirty pounds

30

0

0

?????ipal money A debt being desparate due on a bond from Joseph Ward deceased

7

13

0

The following debts are due to the deceased as appear by his book

 

 

 

John Smith for cloth

 

7

10

Thomas Goodwin for cloth

 

7

6

John Nuttall for cloth

 

11

5

George Brunt for Do

 

 

1

Daniel Mason? For Do

 

6

2

Jasper Hollan? For Do

 

4

8

Thomas Goodwin for Do

 

8

10½

Sarah Moss

 

4

Margaret Naden

 

11

0

Mary Crichlow

 

1

9

Joseph Cottes Do

 

2

10

Esther Wardles

 

1

6

 

49

13

11

 

 

 

£

s

d

Ralph Oliver

 

4

7

John and Joseph  ??

 

8

3

Matthias Wood

 

2

0

Thomas Wheeldon for a mare

3

0

0

William Plant

4

14

0

Isabell Goodwin

?

0

0

Michael Brown for sheep

4

3

0

John Naden for sheep

3

17

0

Joseph Wardle Brand

1

2

4

Jasper Holland for cloth

 

9

7

 

26

2

9

1st side

74

14

6

2d side

25

7

4

3 side

49

13

11

 

1751

17

6

 

And this exhibitant doth upon her oath declare that the foregoing inventory contains a true and perfect inventory of all and singular the goods chattels personal estates of the said Deceased which since his death have come to her hands possession or knowledge but if at any time hereafter she shall discover any thither? and other? personal estates of the said deceased she wil? Readily charge herself therewith and add? the same to the inventory

 

2d July 1754

 

The above named Jane Naden was sworn to the truth of this inventory Declaration by law?

Mark of Jane Naden

Inventory of the goods of John Naden

 

  Original

Tho White Jnr

 

The following debts have been discovered to be part of the personal estates of John Naden deceased by the said Jane Naden the Exhibitant since she gave the foregoing inventory therefore

pray? that the same may be added thereto to wit

 

 

£

s

d

Thomas Pickford for cloth

 

6

0

Ralph Shaw for cloth

 

2

0

George Brown for cloth

 

3

6

Ann Burchen? for Do

 

7

2

Ralph Hope

 

4

6

Saml Naden

2

6

0

Ralph Bradbury

 

10

0

William Clowe

4

15

0

Thomas Dean for cloth

 

7

Mary Nuttall for cloth

 

13

0

Thomas Limer for cloth

 

1

7

John Smith for a cow

1

16

0

John Prince for sheep & a cow

2

16

0

Wm Hambleton for butter & cheese

1

16

0

 

 


Will of William Brunt of Winterside dated 27 May 1834

 

Thank you to Cath Unsworth who has sent the following will of William Brunt of Winterside who died 10 June 1834.

 

This is the Last Will and Testament of me William Brunt of Winterside in the Township of Hollinsclough in the Parish of Alstonefield in the County of Stafford Farmer made and published the twenty seventh day of May in the year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty four.  In the first place I do direct that all my just Debts Funeral Expences and the expence of proving this my last Will shall be paid and discharged out of my Estate by my Executors hereinafter named And subject thereto I do give devise and bequeathe All my personal property of what nature and kind whatever unto my loving Wife Nancy Brunt for and during the term of her natural  And from and immediately after her decease I give devise and bequeathe the same unto and equally amongst my GrandChildren William Brunt Joseph Brunt John Brunt Ann Lomas Dinah Bradley Dinah Nield Betty Tunnicliffe John Mellor of Liverpool and William Mellors Children share and share alike  And it is my wish and desire that my Grandson Joseph Brunt shall have the first refusal of my small Farm held under Sir George Crew upon which I now reside after the decease of my said Wife if the said Sir George Crew shall think proper to accept him as tenant  And lastly I do appoint my said Wife Nancy Brunt and my Grandson Joseph Brunt Executrix and Executor of this my last Will and hereby revoking all former and other Will and Wills (if any) by me at anytime heretofore made  I do declare this to be my last Will and Testament  In Witness thereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first before written

 

Signed Sealed published and declared by the said

William Brunt the testator as and for his last Will and     

testament in the presence of us who at his request in his

presence and the presence of each other have hereunto

set our Names as Witnesses

 

(Signed & sealed by 4 names including William Brunt and Joshua Wardle Senr)

 

The oath was sworn, affidavit made  and probate granted on 13th December 1834.  Debts were stated to be less than one hundred pounds.

 


 

Samuel Naden of the New, Hollinsclough 1850

This is the last Will and Testament of me  Samuel Naden of the New in the Township of Hollingsclough in the parish of Alstonefield in the County of Stafford Farmer.  First I will and direct that all my past debts funeral and testamentary expenses and charges of proving this my will be fully paid by me executors hereinafter named out of my personal estate in case the same should prove sufficient but if not then I charge my real estate with the payment thereof I give and bequeath unto my Daughter  Eliza Plant who now resides in America the sum of One Hundred pounds for her own absolute use and benefit and I direct the same to be paid to her within twelve calendar months next after my decease out of my personal estate I give and  Devise unto my daughter Sarah Ann Naden All that my messuage or dwellinghouse situate in Longnor in the parish of Alsonefield in the County of Stafford now used and occupied by Mr Pegg as a Public House and called or known by the name  or sign of the Horse Shoe together with the two stables Pighouse Dung yard and privy and all other appurtenances thereto adjoining and belonging  And also all those two closed pieces or parcels of land situate in the Township of Longnor aforesaid and called or known by the names of Watsons Croft and the Pingle now in the occupation of Francis Pegg as tenant.  To hold the same with their appurtenances unto my said daughter Sarah Ann Naden with the consent  of my landlord Sir John Harpur Crewe Baronet the possession of the farm lands and premises called the New which I now occupy I give and devise unto my said daughter Frances Naden  All that blacksmiths shop and shed adjoining thereto situate in Longnor aforesaid And also all those my three messuages tenements or dwellinghouses with the close piece or parcel of land adjoining thereto situate behind the Methodist Chapel in Longnor aforesaid and now in the several occupations of ----Kidd Charles Milward and  -- Harrison as in tenants thereof  To hold the same with their appurtenances unto my said daughter Frances Naden her heirs and assign?? For her I also give and devise all and singular other my real estate (not hereinbefore by me disposed of) and after payment of all my said just debts funeral expenses and all other charges which my executors hereinafter named may incur or sustain and subject to the payment of the said legacy or sum of one hundred pounds hereinbefore given and bequeathed  I give and bequeath all the rest residence and remainder of my personal estate and effects of what nature or kind ??? wheresoever the same may be To hold  the same unto my said daughter Frances Naden her heirs executors administrators and assign? For ever according to the nature or quality of the same respectively I give and devise unto my two friends William Johnson of Fawside near Longnor aforesaid gentleman and Richard Wood Dale of the Township of Fawfield head in the parish of Alstonefield aforesaid farmer all mortgage and trust estates which may be vested in me at the time of my decease upon the like trusts and equities upon which I hold the same respectively I hereby nominate constitute and appoint my said friends William Johnson and Richard Wood Dale executors of this my will and hereby revoke and make void all former wills by me made and do declare this alone to be my last will and testament And I direct that my said executors shall deduct  retain and reimburse himself and themselves all such costs charges and expenses as  they may sustain or be put to ?? about the execution of this my will and I direct that their receipts shall be good discharges In Witness thereof  the said testator Samuel Naden have to this my last will and testament contained on two sheets of paper subscribed my name this fourth day of May One thousand eight hundred and fifty

 

Signed and declared by the said testator

Samuel Naden as and for his last will

and testament in the presence of us being                          Samuel Naden    

all present at the same time who at his

rquest in his presence and in the presence

of each other have herewith subscribed over

names as witnesses

Geo Brittlebank

of Ashborne

Frank Brittlebank

of Winster


 

From Consistory Court documents at Lichfield

abridged version

B/C/11/1850

Will of Christopher Coates 28th August 1850

Yeoman of Hollingsclough Died 11/8/1850

Executors William Naden of the Orchard & Thomas Goodwin of the Turn Edge. Both farmers

Under the value of £100

I give unto Thomas Goodwin, husband of my niece Martha Goodwin my best suit of black cloth and the remaining part of my apparel unto the said Thomas Goodwin and my nephew James Hulme of Morrage Top to be divided between them.

To my nephew Christopher Coates of Bank Top Labourer

To Isaac Coates and Mary Tunnicliffe both children of my nephew William Coates

Niece Maria Naden

To George Hulme son of my nephew George Hulme of Morrage Top

Nephew James Hulme of Morrage Top

Nephew Christopher Hulme of Macclesfield

Nephew Isaac Hulme of Leek

Niece Martha Goodwin of Turn Edge

Niece Mary Belfield of Knotbury

Sister-in-law Mary Wheeldon

Each to get 1/11 part

Witnessed by John Cooper, Abraham Slack and Jonah Wood

Sealed Christopher X Coates his mark

 

Christopher Coates lived at Coatestown Farm. His wife Elizabeth pre-deceased him. Don’t think they had any children

 

 

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